Comprehensive guide to the 2022 NBA Draft

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Comprehensive guide to the 2022 NBA Draft

When

  • Thursday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. ET

Where

  • Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York

How to watch

U.S.

Channel Round
ESPN 1-2
ABC 1

Canada

Channel Round
TSN 2/TSN 4 1-2
SN1 1-2

Draft order (Round 1)

Pick Team
1 Orlando Magic
2 Oklahoma City Thunder
3 Houston Rockets
4 Sacramento Kings
5 Detroit Pistons
6 Indiana Pacers
7 Portland Trail Blazers
8 New Orleans Pelicans (via LAL)
9 San Antonio Spurs
10 Washington Wizards
11 New York Knicks
12 Oklahoma City Thunder (via LAC)
13 Charlotte Hornets
14 Cleveland Cavaliers
15 Charlotte Hornets (via NOP)
16 Atlanta Hawks
17 Houston Rockets (via BKN)
18 Chicago Bulls
19 Minnesota Timberwolves
20 San Antonio Spurs (via TOR)
21 Denver Nuggets
22 Memphis Grizzlies (via UTA)
23 Philadelphia 76ers
24 Milwaukee Bucks
25 San Antonio Spurs (via BOS)
26 Dallas Mavericks
27 Miami Heat
28 Golden State Warriors
29 Memphis Grizzlies
30 Denver Nuggets (via OKC from PHX)

Click here for Round 2 draft order.

Mock draft

Photo illustration by Nick Roy/theScore

Top prospects

Jabari Smith – Forward, Auburn

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While there’s no clear-cut top pick in this year’s draft, Smith is a perfect blend of production and potential who could play in multiple All-Star games over the course of his career.

He averaged 16.9 points and 7.4 rebounds per game in his one year at Auburn, knocking down a sparkling 42% of his 3-pointers. Smith’s combination of size, shooting, and defensive versatility make him an ideal stretch big man in the modern NBA.

His ability to improve his scoring prowess off the dribble could vault him from a solid starter to a bona fide star.

Chet Holmgren – Center, Gonzaga

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Even though true centers have become less valuable for NBA teams, Holmgren’s uniqueness and versatility as a big man make him a worthwhile selection at the top of the draft.

An elite shot-blocker who also hit 39% from beyond the arc, Holmgren can be a rim-protector and pick-and-pop option. While he may get pushed around due to his noticeably thin frame, Holmgren can use his advanced skill to offset any physical concerns.

Paolo Banchero – Forward, Duke

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With a deadly combination of strength, deft touch around the basket, and improving perimeter game, Banchero has all the makings of a dominant force on the offense. He averaged 17.2 points, 7.8 rebounds, and 3.2 assists to earn a spot on an All-American team.

On the flip side, a lack of a consistent 3-point shot and elite lateral quickness limits Banchero’s positional options. He isn’t quick enough to guard seamlessly on the perimeter but works best with the ball in his hands offensively. In the right fit, however, he could put up massive numbers from the get-go.

Jaden Ivey – Guard, Purdue

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In a weak draft for lead guards, Ivey stands head and shoulders above the rest. His explosiveness with the ball in his hands mirrors the likes of Ja Morant and Russell Westbrook, and his finishing ability is elite for a player of his size.

That said, his playmaking and perimeter shooting lack the polish needed to immediately play point guard. The team that selects Ivey will expect his skill development to match up with his exemplary athletic profile. If it does, he could eventually have multiple All-Star appearances to his name.

Keegan Murray – Forward, Iowa

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Murray’s rise from bench player as a freshman to first-team All-American as a sophomore has made him a can’t-miss prospect. The 6-foot-8 swingman is as complete a player as there is in the draft – he’s a versatile forward who can shoot, rebound, pass, and defend.

While Murray won’t be selected to be the new face of a franchise, he’s bound to fit into nearly any NBA roster as a high-end complementary piece.

Shaedon Sharpe – Guard, Kentucky

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Nearly a year removed from his last competitive basketball game and with no college statistics, Sharpe is as unknown a top prospect as the draft has had in some time.

His tantalizing blend of out-of-the-gym jumping ability and smooth perimeter stroke must be weighed against his extreme lack of playing experience. The risk is real with Sharpe, but the reward could be a ceiling higher than nearly any other player in the draft.

Bennedict Mathurin – Guard, Arizona

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Much like Murray, a gargantuan freshman-to-sophomore leap has Mathurin firmly in the discussion as a top-10 pick. His draw comes as a highly effective college player who projects extremely well as a 3-and-D wing from the get-go.

In the right situation, his eye-popping athleticism and improving skill as a playmaker for himself and his teammates could eventually push him beyond starter quality and into the All-Star discussion.